A United Methodist Pastor's Theological Reflections

"But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory (nikos) through our Lord Jesus Christ." - I Corinthians 15:57


Sunday, April 5, 2020

Online Sunday Worship (April 5/Palm Sunday) Athens First UMC

Welcome to our April 5 (Palm Sunday) online worship @ Athens First UMC!
2 S. College St., Athens, OH 45701



Greeting From Pastor Robert




Call to Worship

L: Our King has come, riding on a donkey.

P: The King is here. Shout for joy!

L: Our Savior has come amid waving palms and cheers of praise.

P: The Savior is here. Shout alleluia!

L: Jesus has come, riding on a donkey.

P: Jesus is here. Shout hosanna!

L: Blessed is the One who comes in the name of the Lord!



Hymn                          All Glory, Laud, & Honor   




Welcome & Passing the Peace
[The Lee’s family dog, Bailey is joining us for our online Palm Sunday worship today. Bailey’s mommy and daddy are also participating in our service today by reading scripture lessons. Bailey invites you to greet one another, not by rubbing noses, but by simply barking out, “Hosanna!”]



Prayer of Confession & Words of Assurance

Lord Jesus, we celebrate your entry into Jerusalem on this Palm Sunday. We wave our palm branches because you are the Messiah, the Son of the living God. This is a wonderful day but we also know that we are nearing Maundy Thursday and Good Friday. People might ask if we are one of your disciples. Give us the courage to say, “Yes.” Help us to get out of our boats of security and follow you wherever you may lead us. In your name, we pray. Amen.

L: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

P: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

All: Thanks be to God!


Children’s Special Music                             
[This is a recorded video of our children singing for last year’s Palm Sunday worship service. Thank you, Laura Brown for directing this song with our children!]



New Testament Lesson - Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29
                         Cathy Lee
[This Psalm is read on Palm Sunday because it refers to the Lord’s summons to “open the gates of righteousness so that he may enter” and the call for the people to “bind the festal procession with branches.” When Jesus entered the city of Jerusalem riding on a donkey with the crowds waving palm branches hailing him as King, we join the psalmist in shouting, “Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord!”]



Gospel Lesson - Matthew 14:22-33
                        Giles Lee
[This scripture recounts the story of when Jesus invited the disciple, Peter, who is the disciple we are focusing on today to get out of the boat and walk toward him. Even though Peter became fearful and began to sink because of the strong wind, Jesus reached out and saved him. This is a story that teaches us about faith.]



Special Music     Hosanna to the Son of David   Orlando Gibbons
                         Voices of Ascension, Dennis Kean, Conductor
[This YouTube performance is sung by the Voices of Ascension, a professional choir based in New York City. Our Athens neighbor and Director of Music at Richland Avenue UMC, Richard Crist, sang and recorded with this fine choir. Wait ‘till you see the unusual and engaging visual component in this video.]



Sermon        The Twelve Disciples of Jesus: Peter          
                                                                     Rev. Robert McDowell





Sermon Discussion Questions

When Jesus looked at Peter, he saw someone who would lead in the building of his church. What does Jesus see in us that he would trust us in building his church here on earth?

If Jesus would ask you who you think he is, how would you respond? Has your answer to that question changed over time? Be open to opportunities to invite people to offer their responses to that important question, “Who do ‘you’ say that I am.”

When has God prompted you to start anew in your faith? What is that like to know that God does not give up on us? 

When has Jesus invited you to step out of the boat to follow him? How can we encourage each other to step out of our boats and be followers of Jesus? 

Hymn             Only Trust Him           


Pastoral Prayer & The Lord’s Prayer



Church News












Offering Our Gifts


Thank you for your gifts!!!
“Riches and honor come from You, and You are the ruler of everything. Power and might are in Your hand, and it is in Your hand to make great and to give strength to all.”  1 Chronicles 29:12

The Sacrament of Holy Communion
[Toward the end of the video, Pastor Robert will invite us to partake of the bread and the juice.]



Prayer of Thanksgiving

Eternal God, we give you thanks for this holy mystery in which you have given yourself to us. Grant that we may go into the world in the strength of your Spirit, to give ourselves for others, in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.


Closing Hymn                     Jesus Calls Us   



Benediction


Closing Anthem  When I Survey the Wondrous Cross   arr. Gilbert Martin
                             Furman University, Hugh Floyd, conductor



Join us back here for online worship services on Maundy Thursday (April 9), Good Friday (April 10) & Easter Sunday (April 12)!

[For previous Sunday sermons, click here]

Monday, March 30, 2020

Sunday Pastoral Prayer (March 29/Lent) Athens First UMC




[This is a computer screen shot photo of our Leadership Board members participating on an online Zoom meeting this past Thursday. Not pictured are three of our members who were on a different screen. As we always do when we meet, we offered a prayer for God’s discernment, shared personal “Thin Place” moments, and shared several reports related to our church’s ministry. We especially focused on the new measures our church has taken regarding the coronavirus outbreak. Our church is so blessed to have these members serving on our board on behalf of the congregation. Technology can be so helpful when used appropriately! Speaking of technology, click here for Sunday’s online worship service.



O God, for many of us, this feels like the longest season of Lent we have ever experienced. We wonder if it felt this long for Jesus when he was secluded in the wilderness for forty days and forty nights. When we began this season, we thought we’d just be giving up chocolate for Lent. We didn’t think we’d be giving up going to the church on Sunday mornings. 

 

But as we think about it, this is what this forty day season is meant to do. You call us to leave our normal and “business as usual” daily routine and be reminded of what is most important in our lives and in our faith. We are not only learning that we can live without some things for a while. We are also rediscovering what we can’t live without and that is your love. We can’t live without your love.

 

We can live without attending a church building on a Sunday morning. We can live without sitting down at our favorite restaurant. We can even live without a month’s supply of toilet paper. But we can never live without your love.

 

And it is your love that is with us here in this arid wilderness. It is your love that leads us to be creative with new ways of interacting with each other. It is your love that helps us to be patient and stay at home as much as possible to help flatten the curve of this virus. It is your love that reminds us that “we’re all in this together.”

 

In these next forty seconds to help remind us of the forty days Jesus was in the wilderness, I invite each one of us wherever we may be as we watch this online video to picture yourself in a very arid wilderness with lots of stones and sand, the kind of wilderness Jesus experienced during those forty days. And then picture yourself there with Jesus. Spend these next forty seconds that will feel longer than you might expect and at the end of that time, I will have us join together in praying the Lord’s Prayer. Let’s spend time with Jesus in the wilderness. [40 Second Pause]

 

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen.

Sunday, March 29, 2020

March 29 Online Worship - Athens First UMC

Welcome to our March 29 online worship @ Athens First UMC!
2 S. College St., Athens, OH 45701




Greeting From Pastor Robert



Call to Worship (Based on Psalm 130)


L: Let our souls wait for the Lord, more than those who wait for the morning.

P: more than those who wait for the morning.

L: Put your hope in the Lord!

P: We put our hopes in God’s steadfast love.

L: God has great power to redeem our lives.

P: We turn to God, who redeems us from all our iniquities.

L: Come, God invites us to the gospel feast!



Hymn           Come, Sinners to the Gospel Feast            




Welcome & Passing the Peace
[The Eckelberry’s family dog, Ruby did her part in last Sunday’s online worship service by serving as a pillow.  Ruby invites you to greet one another, not by rubbing noses, but by simply barking out, “The peace of Christ be with you.”]



Prayer of Confession & Words of Assurance


Lord Jesus, we confess that we have not been your faithful disciples. We do not always understand your ways. Instead of following you to the cross, we often choose a different path. Forgive us for when we have betrayed and denied you. As we continue to grow as your disciples, help us to stay on your path that leads to the cross and to the empty tomb. Amen.

L: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

P: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

All: Thanks be to God!


Children’s Moments (Noisy Bucket Sunday) Mike Bila                             



New Testament Lesson - Acts 1:15-26
[Our Acts scripture reading recounts how the apostles went about selecting a replacement for Judas Iscariot who was one of the twelve disciples. They ended up selecting Matthias to take his place.]



Gospel Lesson - John 13:21-30
[This is the story of when Jesus told the disciples that one of them would betray him. That person ended up being Judas Iscariot, the disciple we are focusing on today.]



Special Music  Ain’t No Mountain High Enough   
                                                                   The Company of Praise

[Our special music is from this same week a year ago when “The Company of Praise,”a youth choir, sang during a school assembly at Morrison-Gordon Elementary here in Athens. They are from Pastor Robert’s home church, Stewartstown UMC located in south-central, PA. The keyboard player and director is his brother. During that week last March, they served at various mission sites in the area and sang for different events including our Sunday morning worship service. This song reminds us that with God, there “ain’t no mountain high enough” to help us overcome this challenging time of social distancing.]



Sermon The Twelve Disciples of Jesus: Judas Iscariot & Matthias              
                                                           Rev. Robert McDowell




Sermon Discussion Questions
Share a time when you felt like you were getting a fresh start in your faith. What circumstances or who helped you to get back on your feet again?

What are some reasons why we might be tempted to betray or give up on God? 

Share a “Thin Place moment” (a holy moment) of where you have experienced God at work through you/the church in building God’s kingdom here on earth. 

In what ways is God inviting you to share your faith with others?

The story of Judas Iscariot reminds us of how tempting it can be to fall away in our faith. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, knowing that following Jesus is not always easy was known to tell those early Methodists to “Watch over one another in love.”

Think of all the ways that we can “watch over one another in love.”


Hymn             A Charge to Keep I Have                   


Pastoral Prayer & The Lord’s Prayer



Church News
















Offering Our Gifts

Thank you for your gifts!!!

“Riches and honor come from You, and You are the ruler of everything. Power and might are in Your hand, and it is in Your hand to make great and to give strength to all.”  1 Chronicles 29:12

Closing Hymn                     Grace Greater Than Our Sin       



Benediction


Join us back here next Sunday (April 5/Palm Sunday) for our online worship!

For previous Sunday sermons, click here.


Monday, March 23, 2020

Sunday Pastoral Prayer (March 22/Lent) Athens First UMC



[This past week, a member of our church took over a hundred Easter goodie bags to the residents of Lindley Inn Assisted Living and Kimes Rehabilitation Center. These goodie bags were made by our Sunday School children just before we had to cancel our worship services at the church due to the coronavirus. This is just one example of how our church is continuing to serve during this time of social distancing. For the March 22 online worship service, click here.]


O God, in this season of Lent, which is also becoming known as a season of Social Distancing, continue to help us find new ways of connecting with you and with each other. While we are unable to gather together in person for worship, for Sunday School, and for other ministries in the church, you are opening up new ways to help us grow closer to you and with one another.

 

Thank you for these online worship services that bring us together every Sunday morning to grow in our faith. While we miss the wonderful aroma of our church’s hazelnut coffee, sitting in our favorite pew, holding a bulletin in our hands, and hearing everyone say the words of our closing benediction as one voice, we also recognize that not even social distancing can keep us from being your church. As the hymn says, “We are the church. We are the church together!”

 

Just as your angels ministered to Jesus when he began his ministry by social distancing in the wilderness for forty days and forty nights, send your angels to each one of us during this time of separation. 

 

Send your angels to those who are losing their income during this pandemic. Send your angels to those worried about their loved ones who are isolated in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities. Send your angels to those who are ill and in need of medical care. Send your angels to health care providers, scientists working on a vaccine, and first responders. Send your angels to those who are in positions of power to make swift but also wise decisions. O God, send your angels to each one of us during this time of uncertainty.

 

As we continue our series on “The Twelve Disciples of Jesus,” help us to learn from them in what it means to follow you. Like James the Greater who learned that the cup from which you would end up lifting at the Last Supper, was not a cup of power and prestige, but was a cup of sacrifice and humility, teach us what it means to be servants in your kingdom. During this sequestered holy season of Lent and as we focus on the cross, remind us of your costly grace that offers us hope and new life.

 

We pray this in the name of Jesus who lived, who died, who rose again, and who taught us to say together…

 

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen.

Sunday, March 22, 2020

March 22 Online Worship - Athens First UMC


Welcome to our March 22 online worship @ Athens First UMC!
2 S. College St., Athens, OH 45701



Greeting From Pastor Robert



Call to Worship


L: When Jesus called the disciples to follow him, he called them by name.

P: Lord, are you calling my name? 

L: Jesus called the names of Bartholomew, Simon, James the Lesser, Thaddeus, Andrew, Philip, James the Greater, Judas, Peter, John, Matthew, & Thomas.

P: Lord, are you calling my name? 


Hymn                       Lord, You Have Come to the Lakeshore


Welcome & Passing the Peace
[The Mangen’s family dogs participated in last Sunday’s online worship service. Maddie (left), Bailey (back), & Carley (front) invite you to greet one another, not by rubbing noses, but by simply barking out, “The peace of Christ be with you.”]



Prayer of Confession & Words of Assurance

Lord, we confess that we are finding it difficult to follow you. We don’t want you to go to Jerusalem. We’ve told you that it’s not safe there. You might get killed! Lord, we don’t always understand your ways. Forgive us. We so easily forget that the way of discipleship is costly. Thank you for loving us even when we would rather do things our way. During this Season of Lent, help us to continue to follow you all the way to the cross. Amen.

L: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

P: In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

All: Thanks be to God!


Children’s Moments                             Kathy Mangen



New Testament Lesson - Acts 11:27-12:3
[Our Director of Congregational Care, Rick Seiter leads us in the reading of our Acts scripture which tells us about the death of our disciple for today, James the Greater.]



Gospel Lesson - Matthew 20:20-28
[Dr. Dick Gaskell, Athens County Health Department Commissioner leads us in the reading of our Gospel lesson from Matthew which offers us the story of our disciple focus for today, James the Greater and his brother, John who want to have a special place of authority next to Jesus in his glory.]



Special Music         Beneath the Cross of Jesus           Kevin Dael



[A big thank you to Kevin Dael, our Bell Choir Director for providing us with this bell arrangement of “Beneath the Cross of Jesus,” that he presented last June in our church. It’s a very fitting anthem for the season of Lent and our journey to the cross.]

Sermon        The Twelve Disciples of Jesus: James the Greater               
                                                                     Rev. Robert McDowell


Sermon Discussion Questions

Why do you think Da Vinci portrayed James the Greater this way in the painting?



What are some ways that God might be calling us to let go of the things in our lives that are keeping us from being faithful disciples of Jesus Christ?

Meditate and discuss what this quote from a book written by German theologian, Dietrich Bonheoffer (1906-1945) means for you as you seek to be a follower of Jesus: 

“Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline…Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ living and incarnate.”

Hymn                                                Go to Dark Gethsemane


Pastoral Prayer & The Lord’s Prayer



Church News














Offering Our Gifts



Thank you for your gifts!!!

“Riches and honor come from You, and You are the ruler of everything. Power and might are in Your hand, and it is in Your hand to make great and to give strength to all.”  1 Chronicles 29:12

Closing Hymn                            Make Me a Captive, Lord




Benediction


Join us back here next Sunday (March 29) for our online worship!

[For previous Sunday sermons, click here.]

Monday, March 16, 2020

Sermon (March 15) by Rev. Robert McDowell




     A friend of mine was telling me how she had been thinking about names for baby boys lately because her daughter was expecting her first child. She said that she was surprised to find that the names of seven of the disciples are still in the top 100 for most popular male baby names in the US.
     The name  “James” leads the way at  #19.  One of our disciples for today  “Andrew” comes in at #40.  And “Philip” is in the top 300 names at the place of #295.  The influence of  the disciples is still seen in the way we name our children. How else have the disciples Andrew and Philip changed our world?  How can their lives change us?
     Most of the stories about Andrew and Philip are found in the Gospel of John. They were fishermen from Bethsaida, a fishing village on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee.  They stand out in the group of disciples because they both had Greek names, not Hebrew ones.
     At some point in his life, Andrew had left his home and had traveled down to the Judean wilderness and had become a follower of John the Baptist. Through John's introduction, Andrew  has encountered Jesus.  Andrew spends a day with Jesus and decides that he will follow him- he is the first disciple to make that decision.
     The next thing that Andrew does is to go and find his brother, another fisherman who we will know as Peter.  Andrew tells him the exciting news:  “We have found the Messiah.”
     Philip also has traveled to the region where John the Baptist is preaching. Jesus notices Philip and invites him to come and learn and be his disciple.  Philip in turn encourages his friend Nathaniel who we discovered a few weeks ago probably also went by the name, “Bartholomew,” to “come and see” all that Jesus is doing.
     Both Andrew and Philip were actively seeking God; they had left their daily routine of fishing in order for their faith to grow. Jesus recognized their spiritual longing and included them on his team.
     Descriptive words for these two disciples are “seeking and sharing.” Andrew told his brother about Jesus and Philip told his friend.
     Two disciples now have become four disciples. What they had received they also wanted to share. 
     Pope Benedict wrote a book about the disciples a few years ago.  In it he says this about Philip: “This apostle encourages us to become closely acquainted with Jesus.” 
     We can't pass on our exact faith experience to someone else, but we can encourage them to get to know and to love our friend Jesus.  We can plant the seed and we can open the door.
     Philip and Andrew continued to introduce people to Jesus.  In the Gospel story for today, Jesus was facing the dilemma of feeding many hungry people. A large crowd had gathered to hear his teaching and now it was late in the day. People had become hungry and needed to be fed. 
     It was Andrew who brought the boy with his lunch of fish and bread to Jesus. He helped make a connection between the child and Jesus. Andrew was not sure where that action would lead; after all there were thousands of people to feed, and the boy's lunch was small. Andrew enabled the boy to give of himself.                                                                                                                                                                       
     On another occasion, there were Greeks who wanted to meet Jesus. The crowd was large but Philip and Andrew made a way for this to happen. They introduced these outsiders to Jesus. 
     Even though Andrew and Philip introduced others to Jesus, they themselves did not have all the answers.  They questioned and grappled with their faith. We do not have to have all the answers in order to help someone else become closer to God.
     When Jesus asked Philip how they were they going to feed so many,  Philip thought the answer was way beyond their resources. When Andrew looked at the boy's small lunch, he didn't see how that could possibly be adequate.  Like Andrew and Philip, we want to walk by faith and yet our doubts naturally arise. Will our resources be adequate? We offer up what we have and we trust that God will work through our efforts.
     In Leonardo  di Vinci's painting, you will find Andrew on the left side of Jesus seated near to his brother Peter.  Andrew has his hands with palms out as if he is pushing away Jesus’ words that someone at that very table will betray him.  On the opposite side we have Philip who is in the threesome with James and Thomas. 
     Philip's hands are clutched tightly at his chest as if he is saying “Not me, Lord, not me.”Andrew and Philip have known Jesus for the longest time of all the disciples and the painting shows their dismay vividly. 
     The book of Acts gives us the impression that the disciples shared the Gospel with others, but we don't get many details about who went where except for Peter and Paul. Through the centuries, stories were told to fill in the gaps of the apostles' adventures.
     For Andrew and Philip, there are many extra-Biblical stories and traditions about them, especially within Orthodox churches.  They are portrayed as people with great passion to fulfill their mission: to let others know about Jesus Christ.
     Andrew and Philip did not travel together in these stories but took separate routes.  Andrew is said to have gone on various missionary trips within the Black Sea area that included Russia, Bulgaria, Romania with his life ending in Greece.  Philip is portrayed as going to Turkey and dying there.     
     There are legends of them bravely speaking out against wrong and fighting against cannibals and snakes and horrendous storms at sea.  They are both said to have died by the hands of rulers who were upset that their wives had become Christian through the preaching of Andrew and of Philip.                       
     Andrew is said to have died on an X shaped cross which is known today as St. Andrew's cross which is the visual on the flag of Scotland. How did Andrew who was a first century Galilean fisherman ever become related to Scotland?  For those of you familiar with golf courses, no, he wasn't a pro golfer....
     There are a variety of stories of how some of his bones were taken to Scotland  from Greece and how these relics brought victory in a Scottish battle. Through this, Andrew became  the patron saint of Scotland.
     Some traditions say that Philip was also martyred for his faith by being hung upside down on a cross. The emphasis in both these legends is that Andrew and Philip both chose to die in a different manner than Jesus himself. 
     The disciple Philip was in the international news within the last ten years with this headline: “Philip's Grave Discovered.” At excavations in Turkey, at the traditional place of his death, archaeologist  believed that they had uncovered the remains of the ancient church built over his burial place. Isn't it amazing that the interest in his life continues 2,000 years later!
     Ukraine is in the midst of internal strife and dominates our news stories today. The Ukraine is a land with a long history of Christian faith and their traditions link them to the apostle Andrew. There are claims that he first brought them the Gospel on one of his journeys in the Black Sea area.
     Seeking and sharing, questioning and striving for more faith, obeying Jesus' instruction to go and tell: this is how Andrew and Philip followed Jesus. In the Scriptures, these disciples are remembered by just a few stories. 
    What stands out in your life?  If your years of faith had to be described by one story, what would it be?
     One legend of Andrew is that he had such eyes of compassion that he saw something of Jesus in everyone.  Once he thought the captain of the ship was Christ himself and that is why they sped across the waters, and arrived safely at their destination. Another time Andrew thought the peddler on the docks was Jesus and so he treated him with great kindness.
     In my own life, there are stories that I would not want to be remembered by. And I have not been chased by lions, or shipwrecked at sea, or have preached to thousands.  But I hope that along the way I have shared some love of Christ, and because of that, someone has wanted to know more about him.  What story would you want to be remembered by?
     There is a prayer that honors what Andrew and Philip did.  It reads “O God, give us grace to follow Jesus without delay and to bring those near to us into his kingdom.”
     May that prayer be seen in each of our lives.

The Disciples of Jesus: Andrew & Phillip
Sermon Discussion Questions
John 6:1-14
March 15, 2020
We are spending the season of Lent focusing on the twelve disciples of Jesus. On this Sunday, we look at Andrew and Phillip. They are the only disciples who have Greek names rather than Hebrew names and they were both fishermen from Bethsaida located near the Sea of Galilee. 
Interesting Information about Andrew: 1) He was the first disciple of Jesus. 2) Andrew is known as the first “evangelist” by introducing Jesus to his brother, Simon (Peter.) 3) In our Gospel reading for this Sunday, Andrew is who introduced Jesus to a boy who had fives loaves and two fish which lead to the feeding of the 5,000. 4) Andrew, along with Phillip helped some Greeks (non-Jewish people) to meet Jesus.
Interesting Information about Phillip: 1) Invited Nathaniel (Bartholomew) to meet Jesus. Like Andrew, he is known as someone who wanted people to meet Jesus. 2) Phillip was also part of the feeding of the 5,000 story with Andrew. Phillip had told Jesus that not even a half a year’s wages would be enough to feed everybody. 
Both Andrew and Phillip were disciples who were willing to seek and share their faith with others.
In what ways have you shared your faith with others? In what ways are you willing to seek a deeper faith?
Church tradition (post-bible) reveals that Andrew traveled to areas around the Black Sea to share his faith with others. It is said that Andrew brought the faith to the people of Ukraine along his missionary journey. Andrew was martyred in Greece. His bones were taken to Scotland where he is known as their patron saint. He was crucified on an “X” shaped cross which is known today as St. Andrew’s Cross. Tradition tells us that Phillip as going to Turkey and being killed for his faith. It is said that both Andrew and Phillip were killed because the wives of the rulers became Christian because of their preaching. More recently, excavators in Turkey discovered what they believe to be the church that had been built over the spot where Phillip was buried. 
In The Last Supper painting by Leonardo Da Vinci, Andrew is on the left side of Jesus near his brother, Peter. Andrew has his hands in the air in surprise that Jesus said that someone would betray him. Phillip is on the opposite side as part of a grouping of three with the disciples, James and Thomas.
Who are the people in your life who have been like Andrew and Phillip and introduced you to Jesus?
Say this simple prayer which is a traditional prayer in honor of the disciples, Andrew and Phillip: “O God, give us grace to follow Jesus without delay and to bring those near to us into his kingdom. Amen.”